Industrial Fine Art

A few shots bordering fine art from my Industrial shoot last year at KSB Pumps, Pune.

Round by the gear, run, run ,run!
Round by the gear, run, run ,run!
A worker at the Wood Work Department, KSB Pump, Pune
A worker at the Wood Work Department, KSB Pump, Pune
Wood Wonders
Wood Wonders
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Goan Walls, Colours and Life

Today, I decided to visit my last year’s catalogue and look through the pictures to see if I find something I might have missed. And I was not disappointed.

These two pictures (yes, it’s a diptych) were taken while walking around the Goan streets. Beautiful solid colours here, in stark contrast are balancing each other in the complete frame and individually too.

Very few Old Goan buildings are coloured exactly alike and solid colours are used for front facades; interiors are usually in paler colours/white with solid colour highlights.

This rendering or piping in white is the result of the unwritten rule during the Portuguese occupation of Goa that no private house or building could be painted in white. Only churches and chapels enjoyed this privilege, as white was associated with the Virgin Mary and therefore the virtues of purity and chastity (both desirable in Goa), but, surprisingly, Goan Hindus also respected this practice.

As a result of this code, an interesting and aesthetically pleasing trend developed, as competition among neighbours gave impetus to variety.

Goan Walls, Colours and Aunts
Goan Walls, Colours and Life

Seen here, the woman is in the everyday dress/gown and the man in a beautiful royal blue kurta.

General Merchant
General Merchant
Passerby
House Number 140

Love : Happiness : Toby

“The only creatures that are evolved enough to convey pure love are dogs and infants.”
Johnny Depp

You read that right? Love : Happiness : Toby

Now who’s Toby? And how did he suddenly spring up? From where?

Somehow. From somewhere. ❤

My friends and myself, ordered a home delivery from a nearby restaurant that one day, around two weeks ago.

Ting tong! The delivery boy rang the bell.

Clank! We open the door, hungry.

In comes trotting, this handsome, tiny guy, floppy ears, thin to the bones; into the hall, into the bedroom, straight to the bed and off to sleep!

All hunger left to the winds, we went in, and started cuddling with this cute little bundle of brown fur, smelling of mild shampoo and milk, oh so heavenly!

His eyes. Stark green and huge. Complementing the golden brown of his fur, his eyes made him a beauty. An instant hit. 😀

Toby
Toby

He was scared though, not eating anything, not saying anything, not licking anybody, just sleeping all the time. We tried searching for someone who might own him, but to no avail. So, we decided to keep him. 😀

Took him to the vet, got his vaccinations and deworming done. After being force fed Cerelac and curd rice for a few days, he started eating on his own and has now taken a liking to Pedigree these days. 😀

Toby
Toby

The point of this post, apart from introducing Toby is, urging people to adopt.

“A dog is not a thing. A thing is replaceable. A dog is not. A thing is disposable. A dog is not. A thing doesn’t have a heart. A dog’s heart is bigger than any “thing” you can ever own.”
Elizabeth Parker, Paw Prints in the Sand

You need to understand people, you need them more than they need you.

Pets, dogs in particular, teach you how to love. Love like no other.

And god knows, the world needs it.

There are hundreds out there, especially in India. It’s okay if you cant keep one at home. You can volunteer at a rehabilitation and rescue centre, feed dogs outside your door, in your neighbourhood, Help in any way you can. I promise you, it wont go to waste.

That isn’t a huge price to pay for unconditional love, affection, importance; a smile, a laugh; a stress-buster,  isn’t it?

Learn to love people. 🙂

To Jaipur , Love Snehi

Jaipur had been my home for 6 years before my family shifted to Dehradun and I came to Pune. In those 6 years, I had never picked up a camera.

Yes, sad and such a waste!

This summer, I made sure to visit Jaipur, where I had practically grown up to spend a short time with my friends and re-walk those lanes and this time, take some of it with me 🙂

So here I present you with some of Jaipur that came back with me :-*

I mainly spent my time roaming around in the fort of Amber; the majestic, marvellous and awe-inspiring huuuuge structure that I absolutely love. Others might talk about the architecture marvel, the design, the lavishness of this place, but what I love most about this fort is that it had so many stories inside these impenetrable walls, just waiting to be heard, imagined or completed 🙂

Standing here, I watch the elephants arrive and depart with tourists with the city of Jaipur spreading far behind.  It is a majestic view; what must have it been during the times of the kings and conquerors, I can only imagine. Oh I wish I could time-travel. :)
Standing here, I watch the elephants arrive and depart with tourists; the city of Jaipur spreading far behind.
It is a majestic view; what must have it been during the times of the kings and conquerors, I can only imagine.
Oh I wish I could time-travel. 🙂

The textile block printing of Rajasthan is a well-known, well-loved art-form around the globe. However, what is less known and appreciated is that this industry requires a huge amount of water!

Yeah, I see; I can fully understand why and how it came to operate in one of the most water-scarce states of India. 😮

A sales boy of a nearby textile shop at the foothill of the Amber Fort tries to sell hand printed traditional Jaipuri style bedsheets to foreign tourists.  Tourism is a major industry in Rajasthan and is the livelihood of many.
A sales boy of a nearby textile shop at the foothill of the Amber Fort tries to sell hand printed traditional Jaipuri style bedsheets to foreign tourists.
Tourism is a major industry in Rajasthan and is the livelihood of many.

Ghoonghat pratha, or the tradition of covering the head with a chunari or veil, is an age-old tradition in religions of Islam and Hinduism. It was (and still is, in most parts of northern rural India) mandatory for women to wear ghoonghat as a sign of respect for elder family members and to maintain distance from non-related or elder male members of the society for protection of modesty.

However, in Rajasthan, it serves a more practical purpose of keeping the sand from blowing onto the face 🙂

A  Rajasthani sweeper cleaning the Diwan- Ai - Aam at Amber Fort, Jaipur. Even when no one's watching (she didn't know I was there and it was high afternoon), she makes sure to carry her Anchal (veil). That pink saree symbolic of the 'Pink City' of Jaipur , takes me back to that place, in that magical, hot (extremely) afternoon light.
A Rajasthani sweeper cleaning the Diwan- Ai – Aam at Amber Fort, Jaipur. Even when no one’s watching (she didn’t know I was there and it was high afternoon), she makes sure to carry her Anchal (veil). That pink saree symbolic of the ‘Pink City’ of Jaipur , takes me back to that place, in that magical, morning light.

This frame below, it is so rich of stories.

It makes me think of why the pots were still there?

Were they always kept like this? I don’t know what for.

Did someone lower them down to fill water and then could never return to bring them back up, and the archeology department deemed it fit to leave them be? Maybe.

What could have happened here?

The guy looking up at me from the window below might have been thinking the same thing. ( Or maybe he was just wondering why I find these smelly bats so interesting 😛 )

I look down an old well or water-tank in the fort of Amer and I see unused, ancient earthen pots still tied together on that rope waiting for someone to pull them up. I guess the hundreds of bats that line the walls now must be using them as treasure caves :P
I look down an old well or water-tank in the fort of Amer and I see these ancient earthen pots; unused for more than a century; still tied together on that rope waiting for someone to pull them up. I guess the hundreds of bats that line the walls now must be using them as treasure caves 😛
Police men lazing around in the shade, while the morning sun shines on the white marble floors and pillars of the Sheesh-Mahal at Amer Fort.
Police men lazing around in the shade, while the morning sun shines on the white marble floors and pillars of the Sheesh-Mahal at Amer Fort.
Forts, palaces, history and culture are pride of Jaipur City. restoration and maintenance is given top priority and so, i find this guy painting the fort walls and keeping them in shape.
Forts, palaces, history and culture are pride of Jaipur City. Restoration and maintenance is given top priority and so, I find this guy painting the fort walls and keeping them in shape.

That is my closest friend, Kirti in the picture below, admiring the beautiful Maota lake and the garden at the base of the fort. She’s the only one who would come with me to climb a fort so high in the early morning light so that I could photograph it free of tourists. XD 😛

I won’t thank her though, she’s my best friend after all 😛

My friend, Kirti looks out of one of the 'jharokhas' or intricately designed windows of the Royal palace of Amber (Amer) , Jaipur.
My friend, Kirti looks out of one of the ‘jharokhas’ or intricately designed windows of the Royal palace of Amber (Amer) , Jaipur.

One of the most fascinating things in Jaipur (the Old Pink City especially) is, that you will find a temple, a wall, or something or the other of such sort at almost every block.

You can catch people saying quick prayers or just closing their hands together and touching their forehead as a sign of respect whenever they see any symbol of God at any time of the day.

Although, it is prevalent in most of India, yet the crazy holy atmosphere of Jaipur is hard to miss.

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Religion is a major scene in Jaipur. On the left is the shop owner with his kids, worshipping pictures of gods and goddesses on the wall while the customers wait for him to finish.
Chaiwalla serving tea at 'Sahu Restaurant' near badi Chaupad, Jaipur. Even though the picture is presented in black and white; the font and style in which the name of his shop is written is particular to the shops of the Old city of Jaipur.
Chaiwalla serving tea at ‘Sahu Restaurant’ near badi Chaupad, Jaipur.
Even though the picture is presented in black and white; the font and style in which the name of his shop is written is particular to the shops of the Old city of Jaipur.

To Jaipur,

I will be visiting again soon, as I have yet to capture the other subtle joys of living here. Till then, take care, stay clean and continue being what you are : the pride of history, tradition, and culture of India while still growing towards modernisation and development. An ideal city to live in ❤ 🙂

Love, Snehi

Glimpses : Gangotri

This post, today.

This isn’t a long post.

This isn’t a travelogue.

It’s just about the mountain air, the clean water, the beautiful sunsets, sound of rushing water, chilly winds and interesting people.

This was during my vacation last month, me and my family were at Uttarkashi where my dad is building a small, cute homestay for tourists. We spent two-three days there enjoying the beautiful air and trekking through beautiful forested hills.

And the day when we were to leave for Dehradun, my home place currently; we decided to go the opposite direction to Gangotri.

Now I’m not going to write much. I’m going to show you.

This was our first stop on the way. The Ganga Yamuna Tea Stall. I am not sure what's the bhaiya's name; but what I am sure of is that he makes the most wonderful tea of all times. It takes the exhaustion out of your bones. He has a small area for people to stay a night or two if they get stuck here. He is sweet worded and kind. He also informs us on the news from around the area, road conditions, etc. Always wishing you a happy journey forward, he leaves us with a warm smile. Every time. All year round.
This was our first stop on the way. The Ganga Yamuna Tea Stall. I am not sure what’s the bhaiya’s name; but what I am sure of is that he makes the most wonderful tea of all times. It takes the exhaustion out of your bones. He has a small area for people to stay a night or two if they get stuck here. He is sweet worded and kind. He also informs us on the news from around the area, road conditions, etc. Always wishing you a happy journey forward, he leaves us with a warm smile. Every time. All year round.
The beautiful roadways, at Harshil Valley. The trees form canopies overhead and soft filtered sunlight comes through and increases the beauty quotient of the place effortlessly. The winds are cold and the air sharp to smell. It is a piece of heaven My favourite stretch ever to travel on.
The beautiful roadways, at Harshil Valley. The trees form canopies overhead and soft filtered sunlight comes through and increases the beauty quotient of the place effortlessly. The winds are cold and the air sharp to smell. It is a piece of heaven My favourite stretch ever to travel on.
It looks like I'm in a story book. Maybe Alice in Wonderland. I just popped out from behind the trees and found myself in a vast stretch of white silt and round stones, smoothened by the fast currents of the river roaring at the distance. I see some donkeys/mules grazing along the banks, and I feel happy being there in that memory.
It looks like I’m in a story book. Maybe Alice in Wonderland. I just popped out from behind the trees and found myself in a vast stretch of white silt and round stones, smoothened by the fast currents of the river roaring at the distance. I see some donkeys/mules grazing along the banks, and I feel happy being there in that memory.
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Suraj Kund, Gangotri, Uttarakhand This is a beautiful spot in the small town of Gangotri that many people leave unnoticed. It is down the road to Kedartaal Trek. The sound of water falling from that height and you watching it at eye level is amazing. The force of the river is monstrous there, so much so that it has cut the rock around. The cut rocks look beautiful and remind you a little of the Grand Canyon cuts. The snow capped peaks in the background just add to the surreal-ness of this place. It is quiet and peaceful there, away from the clutter and noise of the main temple complex. You can see many sadhus and nagas in deep meditation around here.
The streets of the town of Gangotri. People inspired and immersed into religion. This is not just a town by a river. It's Ganga, the holiest river of India, Mother Ganga. And this is her birthplace. Streets are full of merchants selling religious objects, tanks and bottles for filling the Ganga water, beads and necklaces, CDs of devotional songs and what not. Saffron/Yellow/Red are the colours there that won't be missed. They generally are the holy colours which bring us good luck (Hinduism).
The streets of the town of Gangotri. People inspired and immersed into religion. This is not just a town by a river. It’s Ganga, the holiest river of India, Mother Ganga. And this is her birthplace. Streets are full of merchants selling religious objects, tanks and bottles for filling the Ganga water, beads and necklaces, CDs of devotional songs and what not. Saffron/Yellow/Red are the colours there that won’t be missed. They generally are the holy colours which bring us good luck (Hinduism).
Pandit ji in a saffron scarf going toward the temple. These stairs lead down to the Ganga ghat.  The temple of Gangotri, seat of Godess Ganga, is one of the Char Dhams i.e. one of the places you must visit before you die in order to get salvation and Moksha.
Pandit ji in a saffron scarf going toward the temple. These stairs lead down to the Ganga ghat. The temple of Gangotri, seat of Godess Ganga, is one of the Char Dhams i.e. one of the places you must visit before you die in order to get salvation and Moksha.
People from villages of Himalyas bring their village goddess to Gangotri temple on auspicious occasions such as Ganga Dussehra and Ekadashi for the well being and prosperity.  The palki is supposed the carry the spirit of the goddess. It is empty from inside.
People from villages of Himalyas bring their village goddess to Gangotri temple on auspicious occasions such as Ganga Dussehra and Ekadashi for the well being and prosperity.
The palki is supposed the carry the spirit of the goddess. It is empty from inside.
They travel from their villages singing devotional songs and blowing horns and dholaks carrying the goddess with them. Sometimes, the goddess possesses one of them, (usually the same person every time) and enables them to do acts like walking on nails and thorns and other such feats. Probably miracles affirm their beliefs and Bhakti.
They travel from their villages singing devotional songs and blowing horns and dholaks carrying their goddess with them. Sometimes, the goddess possesses one of them, (usually the same person every time) and enables them to do acts like walking on nails and thorns and other such feats. Probably miracles affirm their beliefs and Bhakti.
I saw this gentleman there, on the opposite bank with his small thali of puja items and plain, regular clothes. He was praying to Godess Ganga, and seemed to be quite immersed in the process.  From the looks of it, he might be a resident of the town and comes there daily for his puja rituals.  Devotion is one thing that amazes me. The power of devotion is something so beautiful and at the same time could be so intimidating.
I saw this gentleman there, on the opposite bank with his small thali of puja items and plain, regular clothes. He was praying to Godess Ganga, and seemed to be quite immersed in the process.
From the looks of it, he might be a resident of the town and comes there daily for his puja rituals.
Devotion is one thing that amazes me. The power of devotion is something so beautiful and at the same time could be so intimidating.
People and their beliefs. On the right are a group of peole who are worshipping a trishul, Lord Shiva's weapon of choice. It is said that Ganga flows from Shiva's  matted hair. (You can check the story out sometime, it's quite interesting)   If you look closely at that orange hut in the right photograph, it has Om Namah Shivaya ( We bow to Lord Shiva) painted on it.  Clearly, to please Ganga, you must please Lord Shiva too.
People and their beliefs. On the left are a group of people who are worshipping a trishul, Lord Shiva’s weapon of choice. It is said that Ganga flows from Shiva’s matted hair. (You can check the story out sometime, it’s quite interesting)
If you look closely at that orange hut in the right photograph, it has Om Namah Shivaya ( We bow to Lord Shiva) painted on it.
Clearly, to please Ganga, you must please Lord Shiva too.
Saffron along the banks.  Two pujaris packing up after performing a quick puja for a group of people. It amuses me, really.
Saffron along the banks.
Two pujaris coming to refill their lotas (round bottomed utensils to carry water) and purify themselves with the holy Ganga water after performing a small puja for a group.
My mother is a huge puja-path fan. She spends most of her time worshipping or listening to relegious T.V. programs. No wonder we spent two hours purifying ourselves and our ancestors and also all the water that we had filled from the river.
My mother is a huge puja-path fan. She spends most of her time worshipping or listening to relegious T.V. programs. No wonder we spent two hours purifying ourselves and our ancestors and also all the water that we had filled from the river.
The idol of Maa Ganga at the Gangotri Temple.  With lights that change colour. :P
The idol of Maa Ganga at the Gangotri Temple.
With lights that change colour. 😛

So these were my glimpses of the town of Gangotri this year. I didn’t spend much time there, just a few hours. Enough to cleanse and purify myself for a few years 😛 😀

It is an interesting place, and I would like to look at it more closely. I am sure to visit it again soon, so there’ll be more photographs and stories soon. If there are any stories you have of this place, please do share and inform me about anything new. 🙂

Till then, wait for my next story! 🙂